Happy New Year…it’s the year of the tiger!

This Chinese New Year is a great cause for celebration - with life going back to normal it’s a good time for festivities, fireworks and food!

Let’s find out more…

 

How is Chinese New Year Celebrated?

Chinese New Year is also known as The Lunar New Year and it’s a time traditionally taken to honour deities and ancestors, with different customs taking place all over China and the rest of the world.

Each day is celebrated differently, for example the third day is spent burning paper as an offering to the god of wealth and a lantern festival on the fifteenth day, often marking the end of the festivities for the year.

 

The Legend of The Nian

Legend has it that the first Chinese New Year was the result of Chinese villagers fighting back against a mythical beast called the ‘Nian’ – a fearsome creature with sharp teeth and horns.

This terrible beast would eat villagers, which understandably left them terrified…but luckily an old man appeared at this time who said he would stay in the village to get revenge on the Nian that very night.

The villagers were sceptical but accepted the help.

That evening, the beast saw the village was still light and immediately felt unsettled. He could also hear a loud cracking noise and saw the buildings in the village had been covered in red paper and candles, which displeased the beast further.

Suddenly the old man ran out in a red gown laughing, which combined with the way the village had been prepared scared the Nian away, never to be seen again!

Witnessing the power of the sights, lights and sounds that the old man had arranged the villagers and those in neighbouring villages began to light candles, burn bamboo until it made a loud cracking sound and wear red to avoid any other beasts from visiting.

Today this has evolved into firecrackers, fireworks, red decorations and lanterns…but it must still work as Nian is nowhere to be seen…

(Red envelopes of money are often handed out nowadays too, but nobody is scared of those!)

 

Chinese Animal Years - Which are you?

Each year is represented by a different animal, and people born in each year are said to be born with the characteristics of the associated animal.

Which are you?

 

Rat: 1948, 1960, 1972, 1984, 1996, 2008, 2020

Ox: 1949, 1961, 1973, 1985, 1997, 2009, 2021

Tiger: 1950, 1962, 1974, 1986, 1998, 2010, 2022

Rabbit: 1951, 1963, 1975, 1987, 1999, 2011, 2023

Dragon: 1952, 1964, 1976, 1988, 2000, 2012, 2024

Snake: 1953, 1965, 1977, 1989, 2001, 2013, 2025

Horse: 1954, 1966, 1978, 1990, 2002, 2014, 2026

Goat: 1955, 1967, 1979, 1991, 2003, 2015, 2027

Monkey: 1956, 1968, 1980, 1992, 2004, 2016, 2028

Rooster: 1957, 1969, 1981, 1993, 2005, 2017, 2029

Dog: 1958, 1970, 1982, 1994, 2006, 2018, 2030

Pig: 1959, 1971, 1983, 1995, 2007, 2019, 2031

 

2022 - The Year of The Tiger

2022 is the year of the tiger and tigers are said to be quick-witted, resourceful, versatile and kind.

It is said that tigers are hard to ignore due to their magnetic personalities and an air of authority! They are great in a crisis too, enjoying life’s challenges, and always ready to adapt to new surroundings.

Tigers have some great strengths. They trust their own instincts, meaning that they are optimistic and enthusiastic. However, this means they can find it hard to be flexible when they decide something, which some people may find difficult to deal with.

As a tip, tigers get on best with people born in the Year of The Dog, the Year of The Dragon and the Year of the Horse.

 

Famous Tigers

Are you born in the Year of The Tiger?

If you are, then you share traits with these famous people, to name a few:

  • Marilyn Monroe – Actor
  • Fidel Castro – Revolutionary Leader of Cuba
  • Steve Irwin – Conservationist & Zoo Owner
  • Joe Louis – World Heavyweight Boxing Champion…for twelve years!
  • Lady Gaga – Musician & Actor
  • Usain Bolt – The World’s Fastest Man
  • John Steinbeck – American Author, known for writing East of Eden & The Grapes of Wrath
  • Kylian Mbappé – World Cup Winning Footballer
  • Sir David Attenborough – TV Presenter, Conservationist and Documentary Royalty
  • The Queen – Monarch of Great Britain, Other Commonwealth Realms…and actual royalty!

 

We hope you have a great Chinese New Year in 2022!!!

 

Need anything interpreting from Mandarin to English?

Check out our great translation services HERE

Written by Elliot Glynn